• Note from Carl Turnbow : Ran a switchboard in there early 80s…eerie place
    • Memories from Darrell Brown:
      South Post Bunker Yongsan. Built by the Japanese in 1920s, still some evidence of Korean War damage on Bunker. I spent many hours in the Bunker during exercises in late 70s, early 80s. In later years attended many planning conferences here. Guardian Control maintained operations in lower levels of the Bunker. It is still utilized by joint US/ROK personnel.

    • Note From Veteran Paul Black:
      After looking at the inside the on Facebook the USO building looks nothing like it did in 58-59. https://www.facebook.com/yongsanlegacy/#
      I’m sorry I don’t have any photos of the inside of the building.
      It was being used as a warehouse back then, not very nice inside at all. Each room housed a different product. I wish Mr. Woo could see it now.
      The most striking thing I remember was the door ways were only about 6′ or less throughout the building, as per average height of a Japanese person.
      I am happy to know that a building I frequented is still in use and has been brought up to date inside.
      What will happen to Camp Kim once the Yongsan Base closes and all the GI’s are gone?
      What about the roof, is it the same tile as installed in 1959? That could be a stretch even for a tile roof?
    • The building shown in this photo is on Ellison Street and Ferris Av. Building. Building 1564 according to this map from Internet https://upload.wikimedia.org/wik…/commons/3/3e/Yongsan.jpg
      • Note from John Nowell: In the future, when you take a photo of a building on Yongsan Garrison, please also look for the bldg #. It will be located on the bldg and you should take a photo of that # as well. When we see that number we will know if the bldg is on South or Main post. I try to get the bldg number in the photo as that is very helpful to know where it is located. Thanks for sharing this photo. There many small bldgs with the same redbrick construction scattered on both posts. So, it is confusing for those who haven’t seen these bldgs with taller vegetation all around the bldgs.
        • This building in this photo is a very small house close to haebancheon area. I will mark on a map later on so maybe some of you can recognize it.
          • Note from John Nowell: The Japanese built building at the East side of the HQs, JUSMAG-K was supposedly occupied by a Japanese Military Doctor for the hospital which was located further up the hill passed the Dental Clinic. If this is a photo of that bldg. But, it doesn’t look quite right as it appears to be larger than that small bldg. That is why I suggested that it looks like the redbrick bldg on South Post which is a bit larger and has lots of trees around it. But, I will take a look at both bldgs to get a better perspective on both bldgs. More later.
            • Note from Darrell Brown This is just across from DHL, Embassy Club side.
              • Note from Robert Neff @robertneff: What is the history of it?
                • This particular house is further behind the white House. Close to the chapel on Main post. Not far from the dental clinic i think. Quite unique in that area!
                  • Note from John Nowell: Only those folks who worked on Yongsan Garrison would say this is a bldg on South Post Yongsan Garrison. I do not recall the original purpose of this bldg, but probably an Officer’s quarters. It has been modified with an air conditioner and a few other improvements over the decades that it has existed.

                    • Who would say that this photo belongs to a Military base?
                      Japanese built house in Yongsan garrison that i would love seeing it preserved in the future Yongsan park.
                      Historical value worth keeping and sharing with everyone. Such structures are so rare in South Korea!
                      • Note from John Nowell: Only those folks who worked on Yongsan Garrison would say this is a bldg on South Post Yongsan Garrison. I do not recall the original purpose of this bldg, but probably an Officer’s quarters. It has been modified with an air conditioner and a few other improvements over the decades that it has existed.

                      • This particular house is further behind the white House. Close to the chapel on Main post. Not far from the dental clinic i think. Quite unique in that area!

                      • Note from Robert Neff @robertneff: What is the history of it?

                      • Note from Darrell Brown This is just across from DHL, Embassy Club side.

                      • Note from John Nowell: The Japanese built building at the East side of the HQs, JUSMAG-K was supposedly occupied by a Japanese Military Doctor for the hospital which was located further up the hill passed the Dental Clinic. If this is a photo of that bldg. But, it doesn’t look quite right as it appears to be larger than that small bldg. That is why I suggested that it looks like the redbrick bldg on South Post which is a bit larger and has lots of trees around it. But, I will take a look at both bldgs to get a better perspective on both bldgs. More later.

                      • This building in this photo is a very small house close to haebancheon area. I will mark on a map later on so maybe some of you can recognize it.

                      • Note from John Nowell: In the future, when you take a photo of a building on Yongsan Garrison, please also look for the bldg #. It will be located on the bldg and you should take a photo of that # as well. When we see that number we will know if the bldg is on South or Main post. I try to get the bldg number in the photo as that is very helpful to know where it is located. Thanks for sharing this photo. There many small bldgs with the same redbrick construction scattered on both posts. So, it is confusing for those who haven’t seen these bldgs with taller vegetation all around the bldgs.

                      • The building shown in this photo is on Ellison Street and Ferris Av. Building. Building 1564 according to this map from Internet https://upload.wikimedia.org/wik…/commons/3/3e/Yongsan.jpg

                    • Here is my information about the NCO Club on the Far East Engineer Compound, aka EDFE Compound. A former NCO Club on a Camp in Yongdongpo was closed in 1969. Mr. Rolf Docterman, President, Local 1363, NFFE, had a great idea to acquire one of the closed clubs for members of the employees’ union. This was the National Federation of Federal Employees (NFFE), Local 1363, operating in Seoul. In response to an email I sent to Mr. Docterman, he said: “I can give you the lowdown on the civilian Club. At the time I was President of the local Union. In that capacity I went to see MG Blakefield, Chief of Staff, 8th US Army and convinced him that everybody else had a club so why not Civilians. They gave us what was previously a spook compound in Yongdongpo (I can’t think of the name of the camp now either).”
                      “For the opening I invited the National President of NFFE from the USA, and yes, I hired Milo who was out of work at the time.” Mr. Miloslav (Milo) David, former General Manager, US Embassy Club on South Post Yongsan Garrison, was hired as the Manager.
                      Six months after it was opened in 1969, Docterman realized that the location wasn’t convenient for the civilians to make the trip from Yongsan Garrison. And, he found out that the former NCO Club on the EDFE Compound at Ulchi-ro and 5th Street had recently closed due to poor performance; so he met with MG Blakefield once more to ask permission to move the current club in Yongdongpo to the EDFE Compound.
                      Docterman said, “It didn’t take long to figure out that Yongdongpo wasn’t gonna work, so I went back to the Chief and we wound up with the old NCO Club at the Engineer compound.” Not long after the Club was moved, the camp in Yongdongpo was closed and returned to the ROKG.
                      Fortunately the location at EDFE Compound was even better for the patrons as it had a bigger building and parking for the club operations.
                      Docterman was ecstatic about the new location and patron turnout, “This time we had a winner. Milo asked Patti Kim to come from Japan to perform at the opening. Unfortunately the G-1 kept an eye on us and when we showed a consistent profit he convinced MG Blakefield that we should become part of the Officers or NCO Club system. I refused and that was the end.”
                      This club was named ‘Seoul Civilian Club’ and became the most popular club in the entire Army system in the Seoul Area. Even though there was plenty of parking, many times it was hard to park near the club and we had to find parking on other areas of the EDFE Compound. in 1969 and the early 70s many of our NFFE union meetings and events were held at this club. For the past two decades the Pacific Stars and Stripes had offices in this building with other engineer or contractor entities. If anyone remembers the camp name in Yongdongpo where the Seoul Civilian Club was first established, please provide that information. We have looked at information about Camps Gray, Gray Annex, Roberts, and Baker (Milk Plant). It seems to me there was another camp, but neither Docterman nor I can recall the name.
                      • Lobby Interior Design of the SAC NCO Open Mess , Far East Club by @paulblack.
                        @janowell @sangsonam @taebaek-kim @timmitchell @jacco-zwetsloot anyone who was there do you remember this one?
                        • Here is my information about the NCO Club on the Far East Engineer Compound, aka EDFE Compound. A former NCO Club on a Camp in Yongdongpo was closed in 1969. Mr. Rolf Docterman, President, Local 1363, NFFE, had a great idea to acquire one of the closed clubs for members of the employees’ union. This was the National Federation of Federal Employees (NFFE), Local 1363, operating in Seoul. In response to an email I sent to Mr. Docterman, he said: “I can give you the lowdown on the civilian Club. At the time I was President of the local Union. In that capacity I went to see MG Blakefield, Chief of Staff, 8th US Army and convinced him that everybody else had a club so why not Civilians. They gave us what was previously a spook compound in Yongdongpo (I can’t think of the name of the camp now either).”
                          “For the opening I invited the National President of NFFE from the USA, and yes, I hired Milo who was out of work at the time.” Mr. Miloslav (Milo) David, former General Manager, US Embassy Club on South Post Yongsan Garrison, was hired as the Manager.
                          Six months after it was opened in 1969, Docterman realized that the location wasn’t convenient for the civilians to make the trip from Yongsan Garrison. And, he found out that the former NCO Club on the EDFE Compound at Ulchi-ro and 5th Street had recently closed due to poor performance; so he met with MG Blakefield once more to ask permission to move the current club in Yongdongpo to the EDFE Compound.
                          Docterman said, “It didn’t take long to figure out that Yongdongpo wasn’t gonna work, so I went back to the Chief and we wound up with the old NCO Club at the Engineer compound.” Not long after the Club was moved, the camp in Yongdongpo was closed and returned to the ROKG.
                          Fortunately the location at EDFE Compound was even better for the patrons as it had a bigger building and parking for the club operations.
                          Docterman was ecstatic about the new location and patron turnout, “This time we had a winner. Milo asked Patti Kim to come from Japan to perform at the opening. Unfortunately the G-1 kept an eye on us and when we showed a consistent profit he convinced MG Blakefield that we should become part of the Officers or NCO Club system. I refused and that was the end.”
                          This club was named ‘Seoul Civilian Club’ and became the most popular club in the entire Army system in the Seoul Area. Even though there was plenty of parking, many times it was hard to park near the club and we had to find parking on other areas of the EDFE Compound. in 1969 and the early 70s many of our NFFE union meetings and events were held at this club. For the past two decades the Pacific Stars and Stripes had offices in this building with other engineer or contractor entities. If anyone remembers the camp name in Yongdongpo where the Seoul Civilian Club was first established, please provide that information. We have looked at information about Camps Gray, Gray Annex, Roberts, and Baker (Milk Plant). It seems to me there was another camp, but neither Docterman nor I can recall the name.

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