• YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 3 weeks, 5 days ago

    G.I.Bones Martin Limón
    Soho, Oct 19, 2010 – Fiction

    The sixth Sergeant George Sueño investigation

    A Korean fortune-teller is haunted by a long-dead American soldier who wants his bones found and buried. A Latino soldier and the underage daughter of a white American officer are missing. Several notorious Korean gangsters who own bars in Itaewon—Seoul’s red light district—have been killed. American military police officers George Sueño and Ernie Bascom must dig deep into the bloody history of Itaewon in order to find out who killed the dead soldier, who’s taking revenge on the gang lords, and where to find the missing girl.

  • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 3 weeks, 5 days ago

    The Nine-Tailed Fox. Soho Press, Oct 3, 2017 – Fiction

    Martin Limón’s series set in 1970s South Korea, an era of heightened Korean sociopolitical tension, pits Army CID agents Sueño and Bascom against a mysterious woman who may be the leader of a gang—or a thousand-year-old creature.

    Three American GIs have gone missing in different South Korean cities. Sergeants George Sueño and Ernie Bascom, agents for the Army CID, link the disappearances to a woman locally rumored to be a gumiho, a legendary thousand-year-old nine-tailed fox disguised as a woman. George suspects that the woman is no mythical creature, but a criminal who’s good at covering her tracks.

    Meanwhile, George and Ernie are caught in a power struggle between two high-ranking women in the 8th Army. Scrambling to appease his boss and stay one step ahead of a psychotic mastermind, George realizes he will have to risk his life to discover the whereabouts of his fellow countrymen.

  • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 3 weeks, 5 days ago

    Slicky Boys. Bantam Books, 1998 – Fiction

    George Sueo and his partner, Ernie Bascom, thought they’d seen it all. For military cops in Korea, drive-by shootings, flesh peddler’s drug rings–they’re all in a day’s work. But nothing prepared them for the slickest criminals this side of the DMZ.
    The Slicky Boys were everywhere. They could kill a man a thousand ways you don’t even want to know about. And you’ll never hear them coming.
    The Slicky Boys steal, they kill, they slip away. And George and Ernie are about to discover that even the U.S. military is no match for evil, and that human sympathy can sometimes lead to a lonely grave.

  • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 3 weeks, 5 days ago

    Nightmare Range: The Collected Sueno and Bascom Short Stories (Soho Crime) Paperback – May 13, 2014
    by Martin Limon Soho Press, Fiction

    “Limón, who was stationed in Korea for the Army, writes with empathy for the Korean people as well for the young GIs dropped into a foreign culture.” —Boston Globe

    Twenty years ago, Martin Limón published his first mystery story featuring Sergeant George Sueño, a young Mexican American army detective stationed on the US 8th Army base in South Korea in the early 1970s, the heart of the Cold War. George and his investigating partner, the rowdy and short-fused Sergeant Ernie Bascom, are assigned cases in which the 8th Army has come into conflict with local Korean law enforcement–often incidents in which American soldiers, who are not known for being on their best behavior in their Asian host country, have committed a crime. George Sueño’s job is partially to solve crimes, but mostly to cover top brass’s backside and make sure the US Army doesn’t look bad. Thoughtful, observant George, who is conversant in Korean, constantly faces difficult choices about whether to follow his orders or his conscience.

    Nine critically acclaimed novels later, Soho Crime is releasing a collection of Martin Limón’s award-winning short stories featuring Sergeants Sueño and Bascom. The stories within have been published over the last twenty years in a variety of magazines, mostly in Alfred Hitchcock, but have never before been available in book form.

  • Early one rainy morning, an officer at the head of the 8th United States Army Claims Office is brutally murdered by a man carrying a small iron sickle. His secretary is the sole witness to the incident, but she did not see who the man was.

    CID agents Ernie Bascom and George Sueño are eager to start investigating. But instead, they are assigned black market duty, a strange choice given their knack for solving cases and working knowledge of the Korean language. Naturally, they can’t help themselves, and they begin to poke around, searching for witnesses and motives. Somehow, each person they speak to has not yet been interviewed. The 8th Army isn’t great at solving cases, but they aren’t that bad either. As George and Ernie continue their search, they begin to suspect that not everyone wants the case solved. (less)

    • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 3 weeks, 5 days ago

      The Iron Sickle by Martin Limón
      Soho Press, Incorporated, 2014 – Fiction

      When a U.S. Army Claims officer stationed in South Korea is murdered in grisly fashion the roustabout duo of George Sueno and Ernie Bascom go against orders to track a calculating killer.
      Early one rainy morning, the head of the 8th United States Army Claims Office in Seoul, South Korea, is brutally murdered by a Korean man in a trench coat with a small iron sickle hidden in his sleeve. The attack is a complete surprise, carefully planned and clinically executed. How did this unidentified Korean civilian get onto the tightly controlled US Army base? And why attack the claims officer is there an unsettled grudge, a claim of damages that was rejected by the US Army?

      About the author: Martin Limón retired from military service after twenty years in the US Army, including ten years in Korea. He is the author of eight previous novels in the Sergeant George Sueño series: Jade Lady Burning, Slicky Boys, Buddha’s Money, The Door to Bitterness, The Wandering Ghost, GI Bones, Mr. Kill, and The Joy Brigade, as well as the short story collection Nightmare Range. He lives near Seattle.

      • Early one rainy morning, an officer at the head of the 8th United States Army Claims Office is brutally murdered by a man carrying a small iron sickle. His secretary is the sole witness to the incident, but she did not see who the man was.

        CID agents Ernie Bascom and George Sueño are eager to start investigating. But instead, they are assigned black market duty, a strange choice given their knack for solving cases and working knowledge of the Korean language. Naturally, they can’t help themselves, and they begin to poke around, searching for witnesses and motives. Somehow, each person they speak to has not yet been interviewed. The 8th Army isn’t great at solving cases, but they aren’t that bad either. As George and Ernie continue their search, they begin to suspect that not everyone wants the case solved. (less)

    • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 3 months ago

      Frunk the Skunk Paperback – July 1, 2008 By Samia Mounts
      “FRUNK THE SKUNK SMELLS LIKE JUNK!”

      Upon hearing this played-out chant, eleven-year-old Tarryn Frunk does not expect the eighth grade to be different from any other school year, unlike two years ago when she and her family first moved to Seoul, South Korea. It turns out that even an American army base halfway around the world is just an extension of American suburbia, and the kids there are just as mean, especially when you are two grades ahead in school, make sculptures out of found objects (a.k.a. junk), and have a white streak in your incredibly frizzy hair.

      But two significant events—one humiliating, the other flattering—happen to Tarryn on the first day of eighth grade, changing the course of the school year and upsetting the dynamics of what were once believed to be steadfast friendships.

      In her debut novel, Samia Mounts perfectly captures the vulnerability of adolescents—both the outsiders and the in-crowd—and also conveys the nuances of everyday life on an American army base.

      The unique illustrations of Luca Matricardi—found in every chapter—bring the world of Tarryn Frunk to life.

      https://www.amazon.com/Frunk-Skunk-Samia-Mounts/dp/0979884101

    • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 5 months ago

      Yongsan author tackles the chivalry question.
      Jeffrey Wertz, author of the book “The Gentleman: A Dying Breed in America.” is working at USAG Yongsan and took some time to talk about the book, which hit the book stores June 4.
      https://korea.stripes.com/news/yongsan-author-tackles-chivalry-question#sthash.yMmlqqNG.dpbs
    • Coco Cugat posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 5 months, 3 weeks ago

      We Go Together IV_2016
      Prize-winning Essay by the United States Forces in Korea
      Korea Corporate Members of AUSA
      • Slicky Boys (A Sergeants Sueño and Bascom Novel) Paperback – October 1, 2004
        by Martin Limón (Author)
        https://www.amazon.com/Slicky-Sergeants-Sue%C3%B1o-Bascom-Novel/dp/1569473854

      • Note from Mr. Martin Limón on November 2017.
        I am saddened that the old compound is closing but glad that an attempt is being made to memorialize its history. When I first arrived in the 60s–and also in the 70s and 80s–it was a vibrant place. For a while, the center of my life. Please let me know how I might be able to help.

      • 11/10/2017, Yongsan Legacy Project: Martin Limón

        I landed at Kimpo Army Airfield, along with about fifty other GIs, in June of 1968. On the right side of the runway were jet fighters lurking in sandbagged revetments and on the left a row of Quonset huts painted olive drab. After running us through a maze of shots and personnel in-processing, we were loaded onto green army buses and driven past a ROK Army machine gun nest into the countryside of the ancient country once known as the Land of the Morning Calm.
        Rice paddies, stretching for acres; waves of tall, iridescent green shoots interrupted only by the occasional white crane flapping its way lazily into a blue sky. Little boys rode the backs of oxen. Farm houses seemed to be made of mud brick and were topped, improbably, by bundles of straw thatch. I thought I had entered the land of the Brothers Grimm.
        After a couple of days at ASCOM, the Army Support Command, we were once again loaded onto a green army vehicle, this one smaller, and after crossing the Third Han River Bridge, I caught my first glimpse of the ancient city of Seoul. People bustled everywhere. Grandmothers in long skirts hauling grandchildren on their backs, men bent beneath the weight of A-frames laden with charcoal briquettes, bicyclists leaning all their weight onto pedals in order to propel their impossibly heavy cargo.
        And suddenly a world of lawns and straight roads and two-story brick buildings, and men in uniform marching briskly down cement sidewalks. “Yongsan Compound,” the driver told us.
        At Headquarters Company 8th Army I was assigned to a bunk in a barracks and introduced to a man who said he would shine my shoes and make my bed and do my laundry, all for the exorbitant fee of about thirty dollars a month. He was older than me and world weary and I didn’t quibble as he helped me stow my gear.
        I was assigned to 8th Army PAO, the Public Affairs Office. My job was to monitor the Hapdong and Donghua Korean news services. I collected and collated all stories that had to do with the U.S. Forces Korea or the 8th U.S. Army or any of our subordinate units. This wasn’t difficult since all the stories were already translated into English. The spelling and syntax were a little rough but it was my job to spruce it up. Once I had the stories in a pile I re-typed them and organized them into a newsletter that was distributed throughout the country, to all the army and air force and naval units. It was called the Korean News Roundup.
        About half the stories dealt with crime. About ninety percent were American-on-Korean crime. The remaining ten percent, maybe less, told of Korean-on-American crime. I’d take the stories over to the 8th Army MP Station and compare them to something called SIRs, Serious Incident Reports. Then I’d input the SIR number (if one existed) at the end of the story. The official MP version of events often differed from the Korean news report. Usually by downplaying the brutality and the culpability of the American GIs.
        I didn’t know it then but decades later I’d become a mystery writer whose subject was, and is, GI crime in the Republic of Korea. Luckily, I write fiction because I didn’t have the foresight to save any of the dozens of copies of the Korean News Roundup I edited. But the broad subjects I remember: GIs robbing cab drivers, GIs beating up business girls, GI trashing chop houses, GIs raping innocent women. It wasn’t a pretty picture but I consoled myself by realizing that most of us weren’t that bad. But some of us, too many, had become disoriented by this strange world we’d been thrust into and had forgotten who we were. Occasionally, we became beasts.
        In December 1968 the Pueblo Crew was released from captivity in North Korea. Eighth Army PAO was inundated by Stateside reporters, some of them famous names on TV. It was our job to drive them around, make sure they had access to phones and typewriters and that they knew where and when the Command briefings would be held.
        After Commander Lloyd Bucher and his men crossed the Bridge of No Return and were flown back to the States, things returned to normal. Back to the Korea News Roundup. But then, from about February until April, 1969, I was temporarily assigned as a reporter for the Pacific Stars and Stripes. I was sent up to the JSA to cover a MAC Secretariat meeting, I took notes at a speech given by the UNC Commander, General Bonesteel, I was granted a one-on-one interview with Speaker of the House Carl Albert (D-Oklahoma) who was there on a congressional junket. But the greatest privilege of my short tenure as a reporter for the Stars and Stripes was an interview I was granted with a retired veterinarian named Doctor Frank Schofield.
        He was sick, dying they said. In a Korean hospital. When I sat down next to his bed he was wearing a coat and tie but looked frail. He held up a bony hand and we shook. “I’m not a fan of America,” he told me. “Nothing about your country sits quite right.”
        I knew I couldn’t put that in the article.
        Doctor Schofield was a Canadian, originally from Great Britain. He’d been performing veterinary and missionary work in Korea back in 1919, just before the Korean people rose up against the illegal Japanese occupation. On March 1, 1919 the entire country went on strike and took to the streets in an uprising that became known as the Sam-il Movement. Sam-il for March 1st.
        The Japanese police and military put down the insurrection brutally. Many people were executed but a foreigner like Doctor Schofield, who had written and published both photographs and articles delineating the grievances of the Korean people, was merely detained and then deported. Ordered by the Japanese never to return. But his Korean comrades in arms never forgot him. Fifty years later, during the 50 year anniversary of the Sam-il Movement, on March 1, 1969, Doctor Schofield was invited back by the Korean government. An honored guest, he actually sat on the podium during the national memorial service as President Pak Chung-hee addressed the country. He was so highly thought of by the Koreans that when he passed away a few months later, he became the first foreigner ever to be interred in the Korean National Cemetery.
        In our interview, Doctor Schofield talked mainly about Korea and the bravery of the Korean people. Try as I might, I couldn’t coax him into telling me anything about the articles he’d published in newspapers and magazines throughout the world and the attention he’d brought to the Korean cause. He was impatient at my questions and waved me away. The story, he said, wasn’t about him. It was about the dead. They were the brave ones.
        In April of 1969 a U.S. Navy EC-121 reconnaissance plane was shot down over the East Sea by the North Koreans and thirty-one American sailors were killed. For a while, we thought the newly-elected President, Richard Nixon, would declare war on the regime to the north. In the end, he didn’t. Vietnam, it seemed, had absorbed all his attention.
        In June, 1969, I left Korea and left the army. I thought I could forget the place. I couldn’t. Later I reenlisted and came back, this time throwing myself into the study of the Korean language and the ancient culture and traveling to every out of the way place I could find time to visit. I ended up serving a total of five tours in Korea during a more than twenty-year army career. Three of those tours were on Yongsan Compound. And even when I was stationed up north, I visited Seoul every chance I got.
        In January 1991, while still on active duty, I published my first story featuring 8th Army CID agents George Sueño and Ernie Bascom. It was called The Blackmarket Detail and appeared in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine. Since then George and Ernie have appeared in twelve novels and at least two dozen short stories. The first novel, Jade Lady Burning, was published in 1992 and became a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. The most recent novel, The Nine-tailed Fox, came out in October 2017.
        George and Ernie roam all over Korea but they always start their investigations on Yongsan Compound and they always return there.
        In my heart, so do I.

        Martin Limón
        November 12, 2017
        Lynnwood, Washington, U.S.A.

    • Coco Cugat posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 5 months, 3 weeks ago

      Pop Goes Korea, by Mark James Russell

      South Korea came from nowhere in the 1990s to become one of the biggest producers of pop content (movies, music, comic books, TV dramas, online gaming) in Asia—and the West. Why? Who’s behind it? Pop Goes Korea tells an exciting tale of rapid growth and wild success ….
      http://www.markjamesrussell.com/pop-goes-korea/

    • Daniel Oh posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 5 months, 4 weeks ago

      Martin Limon – At seventeen, Martin Limon joined the army and served briefly as a reporter for the Pacific Stars & Stripes in Seoul, Korea. During five tours in Korea, he studied the language, traveled the country from the DMZ to the Yellow Sea, and was personally embroiled in the clash of cultures on this trip-wire edge of the American empire. His first novel, Jade Lady Burning, was published by Soho Press in 1992 and was selected as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times. The series features 8th Army detectives George Sueno, from East L.A., and Ernie Bascom, a native of the suburbs of Detroit.

      https://www.amazon.com/Martin-Limon/e/B000APL5A4

      https://www.google.co.kr/amp/s/jsydneyjones.wordpress.com/2011/12/21/i-wrote-of-what-i-loved-i-wrote-of-korea-martin-limons-sueno-and-bascomb-novels/amp/

      http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11458043-mr-kill

    • Coco Cugat posted an update in the group Group logo of Books on YongsanBooks on Yongsan 5 months, 4 weeks ago

      War Remains by by Jeffrey Miller

      “One event that inspired me to write my first novel, War Remains, was a repatriation ceremony at the Yongsan military base in Seoul in May 2001. It was one of the most somber and moving events I have ever attended. I made sure to include this scene in the novel. Just imagine, someone in those coffins was finally going home” Jeffrey Miller

      Robert “Bobby” Washkowiak battles his way through the bitter first winter of the Korean War, longing for home, his wife, and newborn son. Fifty years later, his son and grandson come across his wartime letters and together, they try to find out what really happened to him on one of the battlefields of that “forgotten war.”

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