• YongsanLegacy commented on a Photo in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 1 month, 1 week ago

    Comment from @tara-today
    I remember Ms. Kim! Always smiling and kind!
    I enjoyed going there because she was such a warm and good-spirited person. She took pride in her work and found joy in making us food. She knew all her customers.
    • Mike Nicolay: The O.B. Beer that was sold on post (at least from 1958-1962) had a little red “UN” printed on the label. That beer had added Vitamin C – to make servicemen healthier, I guess. 🙂
      • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 1 month, 4 weeks ago

        note from Charles Woodruff‎ former student at SAHS: Forty years ago you could only buy two domestic brands of beer in Korea. These were it!
        • Mike Nicolay: The O.B. Beer that was sold on post (at least from 1958-1962) had a little red “UN” printed on the label. That beer had added Vitamin C – to make servicemen healthier, I guess. 🙂

      • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 2 months, 3 weeks ago

        You don’t have to go off base to experience an authentic Korean cuisine.
        Specialist Derrick Ramey shows us how service members come together at one local restaurant on post. The Katusa Snack bar
        https://youtu.be/XtlmlJJKbnE
      • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 2 months, 3 weeks ago

        Longtime Exchange Food Associate ‘Knows Everybody, What They Need’ By Army & Air Force Exchange Public Affairs May 18, 2017
        U.S. ARMY GARRISON YONGSAN — From a tiny room on the second floor of the Combined Forces Command headquarters building at U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan, Ms. Kim, Man-So doles out hot dogs, drinks and friendly smiles, just as she’s done for decades.
        Ms. Kim, the lone food service worker at the Army & Air Force Exchange Service’s snack shop, has taken care of U.S. and Korean Soldiers at the CFC headquarters since September 1979. She began her Exchange career in 1964, at age 19. For a time, she served as a waitress, delivering food on her bicycle to troops stationed near the Exchange’s distribution center in Korea.
        Now at age 71 and in her 52nd year with the Exchange, Ms. Kim still works 40 hours a week and exemplifies the Department of Defense retailer’s core value of family serving family. Ms. Kim speaks Korean and some English, but her spirit transcends any language barrier. Each day, Ms. Kim serves up smiles while remembering what her customers like to order.
        The best part of her job, Ms. Kim says, is getting to know the service members who stop in daily. She serves them faithfully, remembering what her customers like to order each day.
        “In our office, we call it the ‘Ms. Kim Special’ — two hot dogs and a drink,” said Sgt. 1st Class William Brown, who serves in the Eighth Army and stops in a few times a week for a bite to a eat and an energy drink. “She has a memory like an elephant. She’s awesome.”
        One wall of the tiny shop is covered with pictures, certificates of appreciation and challenge coins Ms. Kim has received over the years. In the photos, she smiles alongside U.S. and Korean commanders who appreciated her service.
        Ms. Kim’s friendliness and attention to detail win everyone over, says her supervisor, Yongsan Exchange Food Court Manager Mr. Son, Chung-Yun.
        “No matter their rank, she says, ‘Good morning! How are you?’ ” Mr. Son said. “Every single Soldier–she greets them the same. She’s the mascot of this building. She knows everybody and what they need.”
        Yongsan Exchange General Manager Steve Pena applauded Ms. Kim’s long tenure of service and support.
        “She’s very friendly,” Pena said. “She’s always smiling–just very happy.”
        Though she’s worked for 52 years, Ms. Kim says she has no plans to slow down.
        “As long as this space is here and she has her health, she’ll keep working,” Pena said. “She knows she has a place here and a job to do.”
        • Comment from @tara-today
          I remember Ms. Kim! Always smiling and kind!
          I enjoyed going there because she was such a warm and good-spirited person. She took pride in her work and found joy in making us food. She knew all her customers.

      • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 2 months, 4 weeks ago

        Note from Paul Black:
        When i served in Yongsan Garrison in 1958 and 1959 I think the Army chow was good for me. Since a dietitian was actually making up the daily food selections it would be best if all Americans ate in a Army Mess Hall these days. Even though it all didn’t taste the greatest it was good for your body. No fatty type menu is best for everyone.
        Photo source: Army.mil
      • YongsanLegacy posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 3 months, 1 week ago

        The dining room in the Embassy club by Peter T Yeschenko former student SAHS,

        I use to go eat lunch every now and then in here….I also got hooked on Ginger Ale and Rice and Chili in there! LOL!
        The Embassy Club was behind SAHS up on the hill….if I remember correctly…..there were some stairs behind the school leading up to the club!
        Ahhhhh…memories! 🙂

      • Coco Cugat posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 3 months, 3 weeks ago

        Crackers and Water protest

        Wayne White: Why did they get rid of the JUSMAG Club? I loved their cream of mushroom soup. Very quaint club. I have a lot of special memories.

        Darrell Brown: I think they made it part of MWR club systems and it didn’t make enough money. Remember COL Mortis had a Mandatory Lunch time MS Div lunch there. Jim McDonald and I made a protest, by not buying a lunch, just ate crackers with water. Thinking back, not the best protest. We were both Hungary all afternoon. (1989)

      • Coco Cugat posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 3 months, 4 weeks ago

        Note from Rhonda Hendricks O’Steen: I remember going to the Rod and Gun club at least twice a week for their chicken fried rice. #HartelHouse for dinner, the best lobster bisque and Caesar salad. #DHL Dragon Hill Lodge was always great

      • Coco Cugat posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 4 months, 3 weeks ago

        From Yongsan Garrison, UN Command to Public Relations Manager of Hotel Shilla Seoul.
        Mr. Neish first came to Korea for his final tour of military duty, but He fell in love with the country and in particular with a person (his wife) and so He remained in Korea.
        Extract from the Magazine International Food Service, Republic of Korea, April 1981. By John Nowell @janowell
      • Coco Cugat posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 4 months, 4 weeks ago

        Staffing the Clubs by @paulblack
        About once a week we went to K-14 Kimpo Airport to pick up meats from Japan off a C-124 Globemaster aircraft. These meats included T Bone, Rib Eye Steaks and Chicken.
        After they loaded up the big Toyota stake truck we went to SP 10 where Veterinarians inspected all the meat before any GI’s ate it at various Clubs.
        Once during a trip to SP 10 the rear dual wheels fell into a recent water main construction project.
        I think we had about $ 3,600 worth of meats on the truck. This was in Young Dung Po ( I know this is not correct spelling). That area was a pretty rough district back then.
        The labors seemed very scared as they knew what was in the boxes and they could have been robbed very quickly. Of course the locals could not read the labels. So they were safe.
        I ran to SP 10 ( no cell phone in 58 ) and they sent out a fork lift to get the truck back upright.
        Back to the Club staffing. I think in all the Clubs there were over 300 Korean ladies working as waitresses.
      • Coco Cugat posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 4 months, 4 weeks ago

        Chocolates from the Korean War to the 1950s

        Not until the US Forces who came to the Korean peninsula with chocolates (and candy and other cultural unknowns) did chocolate become “accessible” to the common people. Actually it wasn’t all people who had access but chocolates and candies were something that soldiers passed out, especially to the young children who flocked around them and reminded the lonely soldiers of kids back home. At this time, the wealthy people were starting to enjoy chocolates, but all chocolates in Korea were import items and therefore scarce.

        https://ethnoscopes.blogspot.kr/2012/09/a-history-of-chocolate-in-korea.html

      • Coco Cugat posted an update in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 5 months, 1 week ago

        Snack Bar at SAC (Seoul Area Command) back in 1958-59 current Yongsan Garrison
        Note and Photo from Paul Black @paulblack
      • Coco Cugat commented on a Photo in the group Group logo of Food StoriesFood Stories 5 months, 1 week ago

        John @janowell Share the memorable story that you remember with us!

      • How many people remember the Naija Hotel AFRC; and who had the privilege of staying one night in the hotel or had dinner in our Gourmet Room? The Naija Hotel AFRC was located very near the Gyeongbok Palace. It was just a short walk to the Palace from the Naija.

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