• Frank Tims posted a new activity comment 2 months, 1 week ago

    Good. I had seen it on the map, but had a road leading to it when I was there. I did see the road o one map.

  • Good. I had seen it on the map, but had a road leading to it when I was there. I did see the road o one map.
    • I attempted map study of area, and I did find Faith Hall (with aid of magnifier) on one of the maps. Faith Hall was named in honor of LTC Don Carlos Faith, who was killed in the battle of the Chosin Reservoir about Dec 2, 1950. He was a battalion commander in a three battalion Task Force of the 7th Infantry Division (originally it was task force McLean until McLean was killed.) and LTC Faith inherited command, making it Task Force Faith. Trapped by the Chinese forces northwest of Hagaru-ri, Faith tried to lead his command to the First Marine Division headquarters (Hagaru-ri) but his convoy (loaded with wounded) was halted when a lead vehicle was disabled. LTC Faith led an attack on an enemy roadblock, andwas killed by a grenade. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor..
      • Frank Tims posted a new activity comment 2 months, 2 weeks ago

        I attempted map study of area, and I did find Faith Hall (with aid of magnifier) on one of the maps. Faith Hall was named in honor of LTC Don Carlos Faith, who was killed in the battle of the Chosin Reservoir about Dec 2, 1950. He was a battalion commander in a three battalion Task Force of the 7th Infantry Division (originally it was task force McLean until McLean was killed.) and LTC Faith inherited command, making it Task Force Faith. Trapped by the Chinese forces northwest of Hagaru-ri, Faith tried to lead his command to the First Marine Division headquarters (Hagaru-ri) but his convoy (loaded with wounded) was halted when a lead vehicle was disabled. LTC Faith led an attack on an enemy roadblock, andwas killed by a grenade. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor..

      • One reason the black market was such a major activity in the 1960s was scarcity of consumer goods on the Korean economy, and the abundance in the PX system.. Thus, the rationing, though small items like cosmetics and cameras were available without restriction. The major appliances like TVs and refrigerators required a letter of authorization from a commanding officer (done in triplicate for control purposes). The control system for major appliances was to cope with heavy demand and high profitability on resale of these goods. Why was it so profitable? Korean industry was in its infancy, and the Park Chung-hee government. had large iduties on imports. A $200 refrigerator might bring a thousand on the black market. Lower-ranking American soldiers( PFCs and Sp4s) were paid maybe $150 or $200 a month,,but if they lived on post, their commanding officer knew they had no need for a refrigerator. This was mainly a problem on large bases such as Yongsan, since tactical units in the field usually had no (legal) off-post quarters at the time. MPCs (scrip) had no bills larger than ten dollars, and every couple of years, there would be a one-day window to exchange the existing series for the new series, easily recognizable by its designs. After that date, the old series was worthless. Keeping the exchange a secret was important because the scrip was printed on Okinawa and flown up on Air America. An extremely large quantity had to be distributed to payroll officers in the field, so word may have leaked out to those “connected,” but the new series arrived on a weekend–and “scrip exchange day” was the following Monday. All compounds were sealed on exchange day. In 1969, I was billeted in a (South Post) three-man hooch (sign above the door was “Westward Ho House) and had a clear view of the PX on main post. Early one Saturday morning, before the PX opened, there was a large fire at the PX that destroyed the cashier’s office–burning the records of transactions. No one was blamed for the fire, but it seems to have started in the cashier’s office. The big surprise on the following Monday was that all compounds in Korea–including Yongsan– were sealed for “Scrip exchange day,” Life is full of strange coincidences.

      • Frank Tims posted a new activity comment 2 months, 4 weeks ago

        I’m working on a novel on the 1967-69 period, Would appreciate any recollections/ stories/ books references on General Bonesteel and CICGOREP. Anybody remember John McReynolds at UNC J-5, or George Kim at EUSAK G-5?

      • Frank Tims posted an update in the group Group logo of Former Garrison PrisonFormer Garrison Prison 3 months ago

        My unit was in the old Prison compound–US Army Research Unit, Korea, 1967-69. Army Audit Agency was next door. Compound across the road was 5th PSYOP. Does anybody remember the statue of General Coulter (long removed) facing the MSR? I remember the farmers leading their oxen up the MSR in winter, ring in the animal’s nose and steamy breath. Sometimes, the animal’s snout had icicles beneath it. The pack howitzer in front of headquarters used to wake me up at 0600.

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