Yongsan Garrison 龍山基地 February 23, 1904 ~ November 2, 2018

Contributor: Nam Sang-so for Yongsan legacy

U.S. Army Yongsan Garrison are nearly completing their relocation to a new home in Pyeongtaek, leaving behind fine memories of the 73 years of Yongsan legacy.  K-6 or Camp Humphreys, is a fine region for your cantonment, with an abundant underground water source.  

Topic: History, Mapping, Yongsan Legacy
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My magical days in Yongsan Garrison 1970-1977

Contributor: Diane Dahnert

I have beautiful memories of Yongsan. I really do! My time there was magical; something I’ll always treasure and never forget. It may have been a military base, but I can assure you that my friends and I knew that something unique was going on there. It was a time when everyone got along, loved Korea and looked on people as friends. I wish the rest of the world could have had the same experience.

Topic: Celebration, community, cultural exchange, Education, People, Yongsan Legacy
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My Halloween in Seoul Area Command (Yongsan Garrison) in 1957

Contributor: Bill Morgenstein

“For some reason Halloween was a big holiday for us.  Halloween was party time. You drank until you fell. The ambassador was long gone and…

Topic: Celebration, community, People, Yongsan Legacy
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Yongsan Garrison opens to Korean public for first time in 114 years

Contributor: Yongsan Legacy Team

The Yongsan Garrison, which served as the US military headquarters in South Korea until the headquarters’ relocation to Pyeongtaek, Gyeonggi Province, in June, opened to the public for the first time in 114 years on Friday.

Topic: cultural exchange, History, People, Yongsan Legacy
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Inside and Outside of the Gates of Yongan Garrison

Contributor: Marsha Altvater

The Korea I remember and dream about no longer existed, but I knew it would probably be like that.

Topic: People, Uncategorized, Yongsan Legacy
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Yesterday’s enemy, tomorrow’s friend

Contributor: Nam SangSo

“If we knew each other. If we understood each other as a friend. This foolish war would never have happened. I sincerely hope that a day would come where everyone could overcome their differences through talking and not fighting. Finally, we are friends now,” the former Imperial Japanese Navy pilot who had dropped the first and only bomb onto the American soil, wrote in his diary.

Topic: Education, History, People, Yongsan Legacy
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