U.S. Forces Korea are here to prevent another nuclear war

Contributor: Nam SangSo

Dear Marty Brown of Atascadero, California; The same sizzling summer came around 73rd time, and our memories retrospect of Hiroshima-Nagasaki atomic bombings again as you…

Topic: History, Mapping, Yongsan Legacy
Scroll this

Dear Marty Brown of Atascadero, California;

The same sizzling summer came around 73rd time, and our memories retrospect of Hiroshima-Nagasaki atomic bombings again as you do.

My article you have read was published on June 1, 2015 by The Korea Times titled “Last American POW in Japan.” I’m glad you have noticed a 19 year-old radio operator of a U.S. B-29 bomber, Martin L. Zapf. His plane was shot and Zapf bailed out with nine other crew members over the Sea of Japan and all of them were rescued by a Japanese fishing boat a month later just before they get starved to death.

Yes, you may share the article with the “Mothers for Peace,” or any other anti-war organizations. If you didn’t know, there are similar organizations in Japan also called Mothers for Peace or 平和の母.

On April 26 this year, just one day before the historical meeting held by President Moon Jae-in of South Korea and Chairman Kim Jong-un of the North at the DMZ, The Korea Times published my article “Morning of August 5, 1945 at Hiroshima.” The wretched record is attached here.

The sad article was intended for the both leaders Moon and Kim and their reporters read the most miserable human history while they are meeting to disarm the North’s nuclear weapons.

While we are on the subject of anti-nuclear war, I would like to suggest you to log onto “yongsanlegacy.org.” It’s still a debutante website which intends to exchange memories of American and U.N. soldiers who had fought Korean War or stationed in South Korea, and to enhance friendly relationship among the U.S. Military personnel and their dependents and Korean populations.

You’d eventually find out, from the website, why the U.S. Forces are stationed here in Korea – for the ultimate purpose; in order to prevent another nuclear war.

Sincerely,

Sangso Nam, Seoul, South Korea, August 9 (when the last atomic bomb was dropped at Nagasaki in 1945)
(The writer had served as an architect/engineer in the U.S. Army Yongsan Garrison and Camp Humphreys for 20 years)

Attachment: “Morning of August 5, 1945 at Hiroshima”
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/opinion/2018/04/162_247844.html#

photo credit DAN TAYLOR. From article https://www.morningticker.com/2018/05/the-shocking-truth-about-the-hiroshima-bomb/